Academic Affairs

Faculty Development Day

Faculty Development Day Events

2014

“Getting Students Excited About Learning: Brain-Based Learning in the Classroom”

Thursday, September 18, 2014, 2:30 p.m.
Hors d’oeuvres & Presentation of Annual Faculty Awards at 5 p.m.
101 White Hall, Gandhi Auditorium

Todd Zakrajsek, Ph.D. will present "Getting Students Excited About Learning: Brain-Based Learning in the Classroom." Most faculty members understand that lecturing is not as effective as active/engaged learning. However, many clinician educators continue to struggle with how best to proceed from delivering lectures to creating truly innovative and engaging learning environments.

In this session, active and engaged learning will be used to demonstrate how effective evidence-based teaching practices can be aligned with effective evidence-based learning strategies to create situations where students enthusiastically participate, are interested in the material to be learned, and effectively contribute to their own learning. Participants will learn, through participation, how to incorporate these practices into their own teaching.

Presenter

photo of todd zakrajsekTodd Zakrajsek, Ph.D. is the Executive Director of the Academy of Educators in the School of Medicine and an Associate Professor in the Department of Family Medicine at UNC-Chapel Hill. Todd is the immediate past Executive Director of the Center for Faculty Excellence at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Prior to his work at UNC, he was the Inaugural Director of the Faculty Center for Innovative Teaching at Central Michigan University and the founding Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning at Southern Oregon University, where he also taught in the psychology department as a tenured associate professor. Todd currently directs four National Lilly Conferences on College and University Teaching and Learning. Todd also sits on two educationally related boards: ERI for Lenovo Computer and TEI for Microsoft.

Dr. Zakrajsek received his Ph.D. in Industrial/Organizational Psychology from Ohio University. He has published and presented widely on the topic of student learning, including workshops and conference keynote addresses in 42 states and 6 countries.

Faculty Awards

Faculty Awards provide a unique opportunity for us to celebrate those who exhibit a strong commitment to teaching while serving as a role model to medical students, residents and colleagues. The annual Faculty Awards highlight the importance of teaching and mentoring within the medical school as well as recognizing those who have excelled in this responsibility.

Location

Wright State University
Boonshoft School of Medicine
Gandhi Auditorium
101 White Hall
3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy.
Dayton, Ohio 45435

Parking & Directions

Contact

Office of Academic Affairs
290 White Hall
Phone: 937.775.2675
E-Mail: BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu

2013

“A Practical Guide to Preparing Posters for Conference Presentations”

Tuesday, November 19, 2013, 3 p.m.
101 White Hall, Gandhi Auditorium

The Faculty Development Event will begin at 3 p.m. with a workshop in 101 White Hall by invited guest, Karen Szauter, M.D., University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). She will present, “A Practical Guide to Preparing Posters for Conference Presentations.”

Program

Workshop: 3 p.m.
Hors d’oeuvres & Presentation of Annual Faculty Awards: 5:30 p.m.

photo of Karen SzauterPresenter: Karen Szauter, M.D.

Dr. Szauter received her medical degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and completed residency training in internal medicine at Baltimore City Hospital. After completing fellowship training in gastroenterology (Metro Health Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio) and nutrition (St. Vincent Charity Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio) she joined the UTMB faculty in 1990. She serves as co-director for the Internal Medicine Year–3 clerkship.

The focus of her research has been in the area of medical education, specifically in assessment and in human simulation. She has a joint appointment in the Office of Educational Development and serves as the medical director for UTMB's Standardized Patient Program.

Workshop: 3–5 p.m.

This workshop will focus on the development of high quality posters for display at professional meetings.

The commonly used format of the poster presentation allows professional work to be shared, provides avenues for feedback on early work, and provides opportunities for networking with colleagues. Once a peer reviewed proposal has been invited for poster presentation, the authors face the challenging task of condensing and displaying ideas in a legible and visually appealing display.

The two critical features of posters, content and visual display, will be discussed through an interactive presentation.

A review of the available literature on poster development will be discussed, with practical tips provided throughout.

Attendees will then participate in the critical analysis of posters, recognizing common errors displayed on posters provided from the presenters' files, and through identification of examples of excellence in posters on display at the workshop. Attendees will also have an opportunity to modify a sample poster to enhance the formatting and visual power of the presentation. This workshop is appropriate for an audience of all levels — participants who want to refine skills for their own poster development, or those who mentor learners or junior colleagues in poster preparation.

Hors d’oeuvres & Presentation of Annual Faculty Awards: 5:30 p.m.

Faculty Awards provide a unique opportunity for us to celebrate those who exhibit a strong commitment to teaching while serving as a role model to students, residents and colleagues.  The annual Faculty Awards highlight the importance of teaching and mentoring within the medical school as well as recognizing those who have excelled in this responsibility.

Location

Wright State University
Boonshoft School of Medicine
Gandhi Auditorium
101 White Hall
3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy.
Dayton, Ohio 45435

Parking & Directions

Contact

Office of Academic Affairs
290 White Hall
Phone: (937) 775-2675
Email: BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu

2012

"Better Teaching and Learning by Design"

Was held on Thursday, October 25, 2012 
Noon - 4:15 p.m.

101 White Hall, Gandhi Auditorium

Faculty Development Day will begin with a luncheon, which includes the annual Faculty Awards and a presentation by Dr. Fink, followed by a workshop in the afternoon. The presentation and workshop will focus on Backward Design, a common term for learning-centered instructional design.

Better Teaching and Learning – By Design

Dee Fink, Ph.D., Professional and International Consultant in higher education with expertise in integrated course design

Do you sometimes feel like you are putting a lot of effort into your “teaching” but students are not putting the same level of effort into their “learning”? You can change that dramatically by incorporating the principles of Backward Design into your teaching. 

Program

Faculty Awards: 12:00 - 12:30 p.m.
Presentation: 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Workshop: 1:45 - 4:15 p.m.

Resources

photo of l dee finkPresenter

L. Dee Fink, Ph.D., is a nationally recognized expert on college teaching and faculty development. In 1979 he founded the Instructional Development Program at the University of Oklahoma and served as its director until his retirement in 2005. He was also president of the POD Network (Professional and Organizational Development) in Higher Education. At the present time he works as a professional and international consultant in higher education. He is the author of "Creating Significant Learning Experiences" and co-editor of "Team-Based Learning: A Transformative Use of Small Groups in College Teaching."

12:00–12:30 p.m.: Faculty Awards

The Faculty Awards provide a unique opportunity for us to celebrate those who exhibit a strong commitment to teaching while serving as a role model to students, residents and colleagues.  The annual Faculty Awards highlight the importance of teaching and mentoring within the school as well as recognizing those who have excelled in this responsibility.

12:30–1:30 p.m.: Presentation

Better Teaching and Learning – By Design

In this presentation, we will identify the Backward Design principles and then the practices needed to operationalize those principles.  People who have used these ideas have seen student attendance increase by 50%, student engagement by 100% and, student learning has more than doubled!

Learning Objectives

By the end of this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Identify the two basic principles of Backward Design
  • Describe how a primary tool for Backward Design (the 3-column table) operationalizes those two principles
  • List the benefits of following the principles of Backward Design

1:45 – 4:15 p.m.: Workshop

In this workshop session, we will guide all participants through the process of actually using the principles of Backward Design to create the preliminary design for a whole course or instruction unit. In doing this, we will practice three key steps involved in this process:

  • Formulating a set of desired learning outcomes
  • Identifying appropriate assessment activities
  • Creating some in-class application activities

In addition, we will discuss the problems that can arise with a teaching innovation like this and brainstorm possible solutions. 

Learning Objectives

By the end of this workshop session, participants will be able to:

  • Use the tools and forms needed for the learning-centered design of a whole course or an instructional unit
  • Formulate a range of desired learning outcomes
  • Identify appropriate assessment activities for different kinds of learning
  • Create effective, in-class application activities
  • Anticipate possible problems, and identify solutions for these problems

Location

Wright State University
Boonshoft School of Medicine
Gandhi Auditorium
101 White Hall
3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy.
Dayton, Ohio 45435

Parking & Directions

Contact

Office of Academic Affairs
Faculty Development
290 White Hall
Phone: 937.775.2675
E-Mail: BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu

Looking forward to seeing you there!

2011

"Curriculum Innovation: Learning the Steps for Successful Institutional Transformation"

Thursday, September 22, 2011
Noon - 4 p.m.
101 White Hall, Gandhi Auditorium

Faculty Development Day will begin with a luncheon at 12:00 p.m., which includes the annual Faculty Awards and a presentation, “Institutional, Curricular and Instructional Transformation,” by Drs. Roman, Fernandes, and Rich. This is followed by a workshop in the afternoon.

Presenters

photo of Brenda Roman
Brenda Roman, M.D., Professor, Director of Medical Student Education, Psychiatry

photo of Ashley Fernandes
Ashley Fernandes, M.D., Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Community Health and Pediatrics

photo of Mark Rich
Mark Rich, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Neuroscience, Cell Biology, and Physiology

Faculty Awards: Noon–12:30 p.m.

Presentation of the 2011 Faculty Awards to recognize teaching excellence over the past academic year:

  • Excellence in Medical Education award: Gregory Toussaint, M.D.
  • Faculty Development award: Ashley Fernandes, M.D., Ph.D., and Sharon Sherlock, Ph.D.
  • Faculty Mentor award: Patricia Hudes, and Arthur Pickoff--Clinical Science Faculty; Ira Michael Leffak--Basic Science Faculty
  • Voluntary Faculty award:  The Physicians of the East Dayton Health Center, Daniel Hood, M.D., Rhoda Mahran, M.A., Alonzo Patterson, III, M.D., and Susan Williams, M.D.

Presentation: 12:30–2 p.m.

Institutional, Curricular and Instructional Transformation

Description

Impending and significant change is occurring in medicine, both on a “macro” (systems) and “micro” (practice) level. The rapidity and scale of these changes warrant immediate attention to how we educate our students--curricular change is a continuous process which must always be innovative, transformative, and “ahead of the game.”  Therefore, the Faculty Curriculum Committee approved the formation of the WrightCurriculum Task Force, a select group of faculty members charged with recommending changes to the existing curriculum and proposing models for a curriculum for the future, based on the science of learning and best evidence medical education. But the process of curricular transformation also necessitates changes at both the institutional and instructional design levels. In this presentation, we hope to show the important dynamics between institutional, curricular, and instructional change, while outlining the current work of the Task Force to illustrate these relationships.

During the luncheon presentation, Drs. Roman, Fernandes, and Rich will discuss the following topics:

  • Institutional and Curricular Transformation: Learning the Steps
    Presentation of the institutional and curricular transformation process, following John Kotter’s "Eight Steps to Transforming Your Organization." In addition, the WrightCurriculum Task Force’s progress-to-date will be outlined, showcasing a new curriculum model.
  • Instructional Transformation: Looking Forward with “Backward Design”
    A brief overview of “Backward Design,” to aid participants in the creation of new instructional activities and an introduction to the “Integrative case” concept—a model which brings together medical students for an in-depth, interdisciplinary analysis of a health topic.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • List John Kotter’s eight steps in transforming organizational culture and identify how this process is related to the WrightCurriculum Task Force’s on-going work in curricular transformation
  • Describe the proposed Task Force curricular model and its rationale
  • Describe the basic principles of "backward" instructional design
  • List the components of an integrative case

Workshop: 2:10–4 p.m.

Creating an Integrative Case

Description

Participants in the workshop will have the opportunity, in groups, to design an “integrative case” for medical students which will focus on teaching, learning, and assessing knowledge of a single health problem from a variety of complementary, interdisciplinary angles.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Develop an integrative case, identifying learning topics, assessments and teaching/learning activities

Location

Wright State University
Boonshoft School of Medicine
Gandhi Auditorium
101 White Hall
3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy.
Dayton, Ohio 45435

Parking & Directions

Contact

Office of Academic Affairs
Faculty Development
290 White Hall
Phone: (937) 775-3392
Email: BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Patricia Hudes, imagePatricia Hudes, MSIT
Director, Faculty Development
Academic Affairs
(937) 775-2643
patricia.hudes@wright.edu

2010

"Understanding and Educating the Millennial Generation: Implications for Medical Educators"

Thursday, September 16, 2010
12:15 p.m. to 4 p.m.
101 White Hall, Gandhi Auditorium

The afternoon will begin with a luncheon at 12:15 p.m., which includes the annual Faculty Awards and a presentation on "Preparing for and Responding to the Millennial Student," by Dr. Carol L. Elam. After the luncheon, there will be two interactive sessions, from 1:45 to 4 p.m.: "How Millennial Are You?" and "How Do You Respond to Millennial Students in the Learning Environment?"

All sessions are claimable for category II CME credits.

Luncheon Faculty Awards: 12:15-1:30 p.m.

Presentation of the 2010 Faculty Awards to recognize teaching excellence over the past academic year:

  • Excellence in Medical Education award: Robert Koerker, Ph.D. - Pharmacology and Toxicology
  • Faculty Development award: Marc Raslich, M.D. - Internal Medicine and Pediatrics
  • Faculty Mentor award: Madhavi Kadakia, Ph.D. - Basic Sciences; Ronald Markert, Ph.D. - Clinical Sciences
  • Volunteer Faculty award: Kurt Avery, M.D. - Family Medicine; Major Richard Blunk, M.D. and Major Andrew Kreppel, M.D. - Pediatrics; Anton Vasiliu, M.D. - Internal Medicine; Lee Lehman, M.D., Ph.D. - Pathology; Caroline Kennebeck, M.D.- Obstetrics and Gynecology

Preparing for and Responding to the Millennial Student

Description

As medical educators, we recognize significant differences in the current Millennial generation of students and graduates compared to the generation X. Learning about who Millennial students are, and how this generation may differ from the previous generation of medical students, may have educational implications. Dr. Elam will discuss how medical educators could adapt their instructional methods using new frameworks that characterize the medical teacher-student relationship and the impact of two different educational paradigms: instructional (teacher-centered) versus learning (learner-centered).

Objectives

  • Learn new frameworks that characterize the medical teacher-student relationship
  • Compare and contrast traditional instructional paradigms with learning paradigms

photo of carol elamPresenter

Carol L. Elam, Ed.D., Associate Dean for Admissions and Institutional Advancement, Director of Medical Education Research, Professor, Department of Behavioral Science, University of Kentucky College of Medicine

Interactive Workshops: 1:45-4 p.m.

How Millennial Are You?

1:45-2:30 p.m.

In this session, you will complete the "How Millennial Are You?" quiz. The results will show whether you share the same values, attitudes, and behaviors of a typical Millennial.

Objectives

Find out if you share the same values, attitudes, and behaviors of a typical Millennial

How Do You Respond to Millennial Students in the Learning Environment?

2:45-4 p.m.

In this session you will discuss relevant cases related to how faculty who teach the Millennial generation can respond to students' needs in the learning environment.

Objectives

Find out how to best respond to the Millennial students' expressed needs in the learning environment

Facilitators

photo of jennifer Brueckner

Jennifer Brueckner, Ph.D
Professor, Department of Anatomical Sciences & Neurobiology
University of Louisville

photo of nicole Borges

Nicole Borges, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean, Medical Education Research and Evaluation, Associate Professor, Department of Community Health
Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine

photo of carol Elam

Carol Elam, Ed.D.
Associate Dean for Admissions and Institutional Advancement, Director of Medical Education Research, Professor, Department of Behavioral Science
University of Kentucky College of Medicine

Location

White Hall
Wright State University
Boonshoft School of Medicine
Gandhi Auditorium
101 White Hall
3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy.
Dayton, Ohio 45435

Parking & Directions

Contact

Office of Academic Affairs
Faculty Development
290 White Hall
Phone: (937) 775-3392
Email: BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Patricia Hudes,  MSIT
Director, Faculty Development
Academic Affairs
(937) 775-2643
patricia.hudes@wright.edu

2009

Thursday, October 22, 2009
12:15-4 p.m.
101 White Hall, Gandhi Auditorium

The afternoon began with a luncheon at 12:15 p.m., which includes the annual Faculty Awards and a presentation on Changing the Culture in Academic Medicine: Indiana University School of Medicine as a Case Report, by Dr. Debra Litzelman.

After the luncheon, there will be two interactive workshops, from 1:30 to 4:00 p.m.: Experiencing Personal Formation and Experiencing Appreciative Inquiry as Organization Change Strategies.All sessions are claimable for category II CME credits.

Luncheon: 12:15-1:30 p.m.

Faculty Awards

Presentation of the 2009 Faculty Awards to recognize teaching excellence over the past academic year.

Changing the Culture in Academic Medicine: Indiana University School of Medicine as a Case Report.

photo of debra litzelmanPresented by Dr. Debra Litzelman, Associate Dean for Medical Education and Curricular Affairs, Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Litzelman will share her experience at Indiana University School of Medicine, on applying relationship-centered care not only to doctors and patients but also to all members of the academic community across missions. She has recently published a chapter about this initiative: D.K. Litzelman et al: Fostering Faculty Well-Being Through Personal, Community, and Cultural Formation at an Academic Medical Center: Indiana University School of Medicine as a Case Study. Faculty Health in Academic Medicine, Humana Press, 2009.

Description

Current pressures for increased productivity in core missions and ever-constant competing demands inevitably impact the well-being of all members of our medical training institutions and academic care organizations. The culture created within our organizations as a result of these pressures can be shifted by focusing on what is working well using appreciative inquiry strategies. The audience will be introduced to the concept of formation (personal, community, and cultural) and strategies that can foster faculty well-being and vitality and result in transformed cultures.

Objectives

  • Define personal, community, and cultural formation
  • Describe activities and programs that foster faculty well-being and vitality
  • Provide examples of changing the culture at one academic health center

Abstract

Changing the Culture in Academic Medicine.

Indiana University School of Medicine is the site of a unique initiative impacting faculty well-being through a comprehensive cultural change effort. The initiative was based on applying relationship-centered care not only to doctors and patients but also to all members of the academic community across missions. Early cultural change efforts focused on changing the formal curriculum and creating a broadly-distributed, written document on the organization's guiding professional values. These initial cultural change efforts were foundational for a more comprehensive movement emphasizing formation as described in this chapter. Over several years, a wide variety of programs and professional development opportunities emphasizing personal formation (knowing self), community formation (finding community) and cultural formation (creating value) were offered. The insights, perceived impact, and observed outcomes are reported through the personal stories of IUSM community members

Interactive Workshops: 1:30-4 p.m.

Experiencing Personal Formation and Appreciative Inquiry as Organization Change Strategies. By Dr. Debra Litzelman, Associate Dean for Medical Education and Curricular Affairs, Indiana University School of Medicine.

Description

Personal Formation activity: 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Participants will work alone and in pairs reflecting and sharing stories about personal qualities as an agent of change followed by a large group debrief.

Appreciative Interview activity: 2:30-4 p.m.

Participants will conduct an appreciative inquiry interview in pairs followed by paired and large group reflection about emerging themes. The large group will then generate ideas for applications of organization change strategies for Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine.

Objectives

  • Participate in a personal formation activity to foster self-awareness of personal leadership/change agent qualities
  • Participate in an appreciative inquiry interview and debrief session
  • Generate ideas for organizational change strategies for Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine

Additional Background Reading/References

Suchman AL, Williamson PW, Litzelman DK, Frankel RM, Mossbarger DL, Inui TS. Toward an Informal Curriculum that Teaches Professionalism: Transforming the social environment of a medical school. JGIM. 2004; 19:501-4.

Litzelman DK, Cottingham A. A new formal and informal competency-based curriculum and informal curriculum at Indiana University School of Medicine: Overview and five year analysis. Acad Med 2007;82:410-21.

2008

Valuing Educational Scholarship: Getting it Wright

Thursday, September 18, 2008 • 12:30-4:15 p.m.
White Hall

The afternoon begins with a luncheon at 12:30 p.m., which includes presentation of the annual Faculty Teaching Awards and a brief session on how our school supports educational scholarship.

At 1:30 p.m. the presentation "Optimizing Your Educational Activities Through Educational Scholarship" begins, followed by a hands-on workshop on "Educational Scholarship in Action: Step 1, Asking Good Questions."

Plan now to attend the Valuing Educational Scholarship: Getting it Wright, Faculty Development Day!

All sessions are claimable for category II CME credits.

12:30 - 1:15 p.m.: Luncheon

Faculty Teaching Awards
Presentation of the 2008 Faculty Teaching Awards to recognize teaching excellence over the past academic year.

Supporting Educational Scholarship
Dean Parmelee, M.D., associate dean for academic affairs along with Albert Painter, Psy.D., assistant dean for faculty affairs will share how their offices support educational scholarship at the Boonshoft School of Medicine.

1:30 - 2:45 p.m.: Presentation

Optimizing Your Educational Activities through Educational Scholarship
by Boyd Richards, Ph.D.

Materials: Download Dr. Richards's "Optimizing Your Educational Activities through Educational Scholarship" (PPTX)

Dr. Richards will present and discuss a set of common standards for selecting, presenting, and evaluating evidence of educational contributions for academic recognition and continuous improvement. Participants will:

  1. Identify five types of educator activity categories:
    • teaching
    • curriculum development
    • advising/mentoring
    • educational leadership/administration
    • learner assessment
  2. Describe appropriate forms of evidence and presentation displays for each category in terms of quantity, quality and scholarship
  3. Identify opportunities for increasing educational scholarship

3:00 - 4:15 p.m.: Workshop

Educational Scholarship in Action: Step 1, Asking Good Questions
by Boyd Richards, Ph.D. and Nicole Borges, Ph.D.

Materials:

Drs. Richards and Borges will provide a framework and hands-on activities to begin the process of conducting educational scholarship. Individually and in small groups, participants will:

  • Brainstorm areas of interest for educational scholarship
  • Formulate meaningful and feasible questions within those areas
  • Identify potential strategies to answer those questions and needed resources

Location

Wright State University
Boonshoft School of Medicine
Gandhi Auditorium
101 White Hall
3640 Colonel Glenn Hwy.
Dayton, Ohio 45435

Parking & Directions

Presenter Biographies

Boyd Richards, Ph.D., is vice president of education research and evaluation at Columbia University Medical Center, in New York City. As past president of the Society of Directors of Research in Medical Education, he helped to plan and conduct the 2006 National Consensus Conference on Educational Scholarship sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

Prior to joining Columbia, Richards served as professor of pediatrics and director of the Office of Curriculum at Baylor College of Medicine. He was the principal investigator (PI) of a grant, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education Fund for Improvement of Post Secondary Education (FIPSE), which successfully introduced team-based learning (TBL) into medical education.


Nicole J. Borges, Ph.D., is associate professor in the Department of Community Health and director of Medical Education Research in the Office of Academic Affairs at the Boonshoft School of Medicine at Wright State University. She has worked in medical education since 1996 and is an active medical education researcher with extensive publications and presentations on medical education related topics.

Prior to coming to WSU she served as assistant professor of behavioral sciences at Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine.

A licensed psychologist, Dr. Borges holds a Ph.D. in counseling psychology from Indiana State University. She interned at the Veteran's Administration Hospital in Danville, IL, and completed a fellowship in health psychology at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine.

In addition to her work in health psychology, she is an active medical education researcher. Her research interests include personality and medical specialty choice, physician career development, and noncognitive factors contributing to student success. A prolific writer, she has extensively published and presented medical education-related research.


Dean Parmelee, M.D., is associate dean for academic affairs and is responsible for medical student education. He serves as the chair of the steering committee for the upcoming LCME Accreditation. He is the editor or co-editor of four books and numerous articles in medical education and child psychiatry, and in the past two years has conducted workshops on Team-Based Learning at over 20 medical schools in the U.S., Asia, and the Middle East.


Albert Painter, Psy.D., is assistant dean for faculty affairs and is responsible for the oversight of all Graduate Medical Education activities. He provides administrative support to the School's Faculty Development Committee and guidance to faculty on professional development including promotion and tenure.

Contact

Office of Academic Affairs
Faculty Development
290 White Hall
Phone: (937) 775-3392
E-Mail: BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu

Looking forward to seeing you there!

Patricia Hudes
Faculty Development
Academic Affairs
775-2643
patricia.hudes@wright.edu

2007

Tuesday, November 13, 2007
An entire afternoon dedicated to faculty development activities

The day will start with the annual Welcome to New Faculty. At noon, ALL Boonshoft School of Medicine faculty are invited to the Faculty Luncheon and Faculty Development Workshop, followed by the Annual Student and Faculty Awards. The following is the schedule for the day.

photo of l dee finkPresenter

Dr. L. Dee Fink is a nationally recognized expert on college teaching and faculty development. In 1979 he founded the Instructional Development Program at the University of Oklahoma and served as its director until his retirement in 2005. He was also president of the POD Network (Professional and Organizational Development) in Higher Education. At the present time he works as a national consultant in higher education. He is the author of "Creating Significant Learning Experiences" and co-editor of "Team-Based Learning: A Transformative Use of Small Groups in College Teaching".

11:00-12:00: Welcome to New Faculty (New Boonshoft SOM Faculty Only)

(fully affiliated faculty, hired after July 1, 2006)
Meet the Deans: Dean Howard Part, Executive Associate Dean Margaret Dunn and the Associate Deans for Academic Affairs, Faculty & Clinical Affairs, Research Affairs and Student Affairs

12:00-1:00: Faculty Luncheon (All Boonshoft SOM Faculty)

"The Joy and Responsibility of Teaching Well", (PPTX) by L. Dee Fink
During this presentation, Dr. Fink will discuss four issues we, as educators, need to re-examine in order to make significant improvements in our teaching:

  1. what we teach
  2. how we teach
  3. how we "gear up" to teach
  4. who we are

1:00 - 4:15: Faculty Development Workshop

"Integrated Course Design: Creating Significant Learning Experiences", by L. Dee Fink
Dr. Fink will present a new model, Integrated Course Design that shows why much of what we are currently doing is good, but it also identifies what we could add to our teaching that would make it even more powerful.

  1. Examine the place of instructional design in the "big picture" of teaching
  2. Take a close look at what each of us really wants our students to learn
  3. Systematically work through a new model of instructional design that will enable us to "design high quality learning into our courses
    • identify the important situational factors and learning goals for courses or units of teaching
    • determine appropriate feedback and assessment tools
    • integrate teaching/learning activities into a class/course/clerkship
    • apply the principles of significant learning to instructional strategies

View Dr. Fink's "Self-Directed Guide to Designing Courses for Significant Learning" (PDF)

View Dr. Fink's "What Is Significant Learning?" (PDF)

Last edited on 01/29/2015.