Academic Affairs

Scholarship of Teaching and Research in Medical Education (STReME)

The STReME series is designed to encourage and promote scholarly activity related to teaching and research in medical education.

2015

Innovations in Teaching Techniques: Peer Instruction “In Action” — Medical Neuroscience

Mark_Rich_lg.jpg

 

 

 

Register Here Now

When:

Choose between two days: Either Monday, September 28 or Monday, October 5, 2015

What:

Peer Instruction: Watch -- Learn -- Do

Watch the "Live Action" of Peer Instruction during the Medical Neuroscience Course 9:00 a.m. to 11:50 a.m.
Then: Workshop/Lunch, Noon–1:30 p.m., 101 White Hall

Where: 101 White Hall -- Gandhi Auditorium

Who: All course and clerkship teaching faculty

Why:

Integration of the new WrightCurriculum has begun! The process brings Boonshoft’s WrightCurriculum into full integration throughout the four-years of medical education, beginning in the Summer of 2017. With the focus on active and engaged learning, medical schools are under increasing pressures to “flip the classroom” in which information “transfer” is completed outside the classroom, and assimilation or application of learning is done within the classroom.

Peer Instruction, developed by Eric Mazur, is an interactive, evidence-based teaching method that involves students preparing outside the classroom, then answering questions posed by the instructor, first individually, then discussing their answers with peers, and then committing again to an answer.

Dr. Mark Rich based his instructional techniques for the BSOM Medical Neuroscience Course on Dr. Mazur’s methods. Come watch, learn, then plan and practice developing these methods during this Faculty Development Workshop — designed to help you incorporate and bring Peer Instruction into your classroom.

Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. Define Peer Instruction
  2. Learn about the best question types for a Peer Instruction session
  3. Learn effective techniques in facilitating a Peer Instruction session
  4. Identify the technological and staff support necessary to carry out Peer Instruction
About the Presenter:

Mark Rich, M.D., Ph.D., Professor, Neuroscience, Cell Biology, & Physiology, and Neurology
Dr. Rich is course director for the Medical Neuroscience Course (SMD 560) for second-year medical students. His innovative techniques in instructing medical students and incorporation of Peer Instruction methods, will springboard your course and clerkship techniques into the next teaching paradigm.


"Curricular Change — Bridging the Gap between UME and GME"

Monday, March 16, 2015
Presentation and Lunch, Noon–1:15 p.m., 120 White Hall
Workshop, 1:30 p.m.–3:15 p.m.: Implications of a Competency-based Evaluation System

Presenter: George C. Mejicano, M.D., Senior Associate Dean for Education, School of Medicine Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR

Objectives: “At the conclusion of this activity, participants should be able to…”

  1. Describe the profound challenges that academic medical centers are facing with regards to medical education across the continuum.
  2. Understand the critical role of technology as a cause of disruptive innovation in medical education.
  3. Describe potential solutions, including competency-based medical education, that medical schools, residency programs and teaching hospitals can implement in order to meet the identified challenges in medical education.

George C. Mejicano, M.D., photo

About the Presenter:

George Mejicano, M.D., currently serves as the Senior Associate Dean for Education at Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) where he oversees the entire educational portfolio for the OHSU School of Medicine.  OHSU was one of 11 schools that received the AMA Accelerating Change in Medical Education grant, with the goal to create innovations for the medical school of the future. He is a sought after speaker who has given many national and international presentations related to medical education. He has served on the Board of Directors of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) and is the recipient of the Robert Razkowski “Hero Award” from the ACCME. He has served as a CME consultant for the American Board of Medical Specialties, and is also a Past President of the Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions.
 

2014

Mastery Learning and Deliberate Practice

How to develop integrative learning skills through mastery learning and deliberate practice

Monday, August 4, 2014
8:00 a.m. – 11:00 a.m. (Continental Breakfast Served)
New Location: 260 White Hall Conference Room

photo of JOHN PELLEYPresenter

John W. Pelley, Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Medical Education
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center,
School of Medicine
Lubbock, TX

Dr. Pelley will illustrate how personality type learning theory and brain based strategies can lead to increased achievement in medical school. This lecture and workshop will illustrate the application of Deliberate Practice, a cutting edge approach to expert skill training, in the development of expert problem solving skills.

The theory of functional specialization of the brain and its relevance to personality type will demonstrate how to develop integrative learning skills that that improve test scores and clinical reasoning skills. This activity will be a structured, interactive discussion that will encourage informal dialog between faculty and students.

Resources

2012

Team-Based Learning™ Basics: Getting Started

May 31, 2012, Thursday
12:15-3:15 p.m.
Location: 101 White Hall (Gandhi Auditorium)

photo of dean parmeleePresenter

Dean Parmelee, M.D.
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Boonshoft School of Medicine

What is Team-Based Learning™?

Team-Based Learning™ (TBL) is an active learning instructional strategy that provides students with opportunities to apply conceptual knowledge through a sequence of events that includes individual work, teamwork and immediate feedback. It is very much learner-centered and engages students with the kinds of problems they will encounter in clinical practice.  It also promotes the development of professional competencies in interpersonal skills, teamwork, and peer feedback.

Workshop Description

This workshop is conducted in a Team-Based Learning™ (TBL) format: participants are given an advance assignment, are assigned to a team, given an individual and team readiness assurance test, achieve consensus with their team on a set of increasingly challenging questions. There is very little ‘lecture’ (learning occurs through doing) and ample opportunity for questions and dialogue. Video clips of ‘live’ students in TBL sessions are shown.

Workshop Objectives

  • Describe the key and essential components of a TBL module.
  • Identify the challenges that an instructor faces when transforming a unit of study from lecture to ‘active learning.’
  • Explain how TBL, when done correctly, generates deeper learning of content, develops communication skills, and can meet course objectives more fully than a lecture-based pedagogy.

Preparation/Advance Assignment


Team-Based Learning™ Advanced: Making Your Module Successful

June 14, 2012, Thursday
12:15-3:15 p.m.
Location: 101 White Hall (Gandhi Auditorium)

photo of dean parmeleePresenter

Dean Parmelee, M.D.
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Boonshoft School of Medicine

Workshop Description

This workshop is designed for those who have had an introduction to Team-Based Learning™ (TBL) through attending a workshop or participating in an actual module with students. It will be conducted in a TBL format, so participants will be assigned to teams, complete a Readiness Assurance Test as an individual then as a team, then collaborate with the team to tackle some tougher questions on writing and delivering a TBL module.

Workshop Objectives

  • Describe the backward design process and how to use it to craft a viable TBL module, one that fits well with a course's objectives.
  • Evaluate the congruence of a TBL module's objectives with its Application Exercise and Readiness Assurance Process.
  • Appraise and select specific choice questions that will enhance team cohesion AND generate debate between teams in the classroom.
  • Recognize an effective TBL Application Exercise that will engage learners in mastering course content.
  • Go home and write an active objective and a draft Application Exercise for a TBL module that will challenge your learners to apply, evaluate, analyze, and synthesize your course content in solving a complex and significant problem.

Preparation/Advance Assignment


High-Fidelity Simulation in Medical Education: Technology Driven by Learning Objectives

August 9, 2012, Thursday
12:15-2:15 p.m.
Location: 101 White Hall (Gandhi Auditorium)

photo of raymond Ten EyckPresenter

Raymond Ten Eyck, M.D., M.P.H.
Professor, Emergency Medicine, Director of Emergency Medicine Simulation Center, Boonshoft School of Medicine

What is High-Fidelity Simulation?

Coach Vince Lombardi coined the phrase: "Practice doesn't make perfect; perfect practice makes perfect." High-Fidelity simulation is an interactive instructional strategy which helps approach the "perfect practice" environment by using real equipment and supplies along with realistic task trainer models and computerized, full-body mannequins controlled by an operator on a remote computer. High-fidelity mannequins incorporate monitor displays and air compressor-driven functions capable of producing both physical findings (e.g. pulses, heart sounds, and breath sounds) and pathophysiologic processes (e.g. hypoxia, hypotension, tongue edema and trimus). These mannequins can be painlessly subjected to invasive procedures and programmed to provide realistic patient responses. High-fidelity simulation safely creates an immersive environment by incorporating all or part of a clinical experience without exposing real patients to the associated risks.

Workshop Description

This workshop will consist of two parts. The first part is a presentation including a construct for incorporating simulation into medical education programs and discussion of sample experiences from the literature and at the BSOM. It will conclude with a short demonstration.  During the second portion of the workshop, the presenter will discuss the impact of simulation as assessed both in our institution and elsewhere along with potential opportunities to incorporate simulation into our curriculum. This portion will conclude with a brief demonstration involving development of a simulation using input from the attendees.

Workshop Objectives

  • Define the appropriate role of technology in developing simulation-based education modules.
  • Discuss the potential benefits of simulation as a medical education strategy.
  • Recognize the resources associated with adding simulation-based modules or substituting them for other educational modules.
  • Analyze current curricular learning objectives to determine those that might be better accomplished with simulation.
  • Design a simulation-based module to support an existing curriculum.

Preparation/Advance Assignment

Please submit a topic or module from one of your courses which you consider to be a potential candidate for a simulation-based session.

Resources

  • Kern DE, Thomas PA, Howard DM. Et al eds. Curriculum Development for Medical Education: A Six Step Approach. Baltimore, MD: The Johns Hopkins University Press; 1998.
  • Ten Eyck RP. Simulation in Emergency Medicine Training (PDF). Pediatric Emergency Care. 2011;27(4): 27:333-344.

Watch the Video of Dr. Ten Eyck's Presentation

  • Raymond Ten Eyck, M.D., M.P.H., "High-Fidelity Simulation" PPT w sound Part 1 (mp4)
  • Raymond Ten Eyck, M.D., M.P.H., "HIgh-Fidelity Simulation" PPT w sound Part 2 (mp4)

The Western Reserve2 Curriculum and the Use of the “New” PBL to Develop Self-directed Learning, Problem Solving and Teamwork Skills

September 13, 2012, Thursday
12:15-3:15 p.m.
Location: 101 White Hall (Gandhi Auditorium)

photo of amy Wilson DelfossePresenter

Amy Wilson-Delfosse, Ph.D.
Associate Professor, Pharmacology, Assistant Dean for Basic Science Education, Case Western Reserve University SOM

What is the "New" PBL - Case InQuiry (IQ)?

The small group, active learning method called "Problem-based Learning" (PBL) was developed by McMaster University in the late 1960s and is used internationally as a popular educational approach.  In the mid 2000s, McMaster re-tooled this important learning strategy and shared the method with Case Western Reserve University (CWRU) School of Medicine during the development of the Western Reserve2 Curriculum.  This “new” PBL has been embraced by the students of CWRU as their most valued learning method and is commonly referred to by the students as "IQ", short for Case Inquiry. Students learn not just medical knowledge in their IQ teams of 8 students but also important skills of life-long learning, teamwork and professionalism.

Part 1: Description

Participants will be introduced to the medical education curriculum at Case Western Reserve University (Western Reserve2 Curriculum) by means of a formal presentation.

Part 1: Objectives

  • List two reasons why the faculty of CWRU committed to curriculum reform.
  • Describe two guiding principles that informed curricular change at CWRU.
  • Compare and contrast the current medical education/curriculum climate at Boonshoft SOM with the climate that existed at CWRU SOM prior to curriculum reform.
  • Relate two challenges that the faculty of CWRU faced in reforming their curriculum and consider if these same challenges will be seen at Boonshoft SOM.
  • State, in general terms, the assessment philosophy of the Western Reserve2 curriculum and describe the importance of alignment of this philosophy with expectations for student learning.

Resources

Watch a Video of the Presentation

Part 2: Description

Participants will learn about the CWRU approach to PBL (aka Case InQuiry or "IQ") through their participation in a hands-on workshop during which they will have an opportunity to view and work through an actual case.

Part 2: Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Define "IQ" and explain how it differs from "traditional" PBL.
  • List the advantages of the IQ small group learning approach.
  • Distinguish the role of the faculty facilitator and the role of the learners in IQ.
  • List and define key teamwork behaviors in the IQ process.

Resources

Watch the Video of the Presentation by Dr. Amy Wilson-Delfosse (mp4)

2011

Would you like to learn how Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships are transforming medical education worldwide? How will this change our clinical teaching and patient care?

Harvard’s Longitudinal Integrated Clerkship: An Innovative Model of Clinical Education

Wednesday, March 16, 2011
12:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Location
101 White Hall (Gandhi Auditorium)

Description

Most medical schools value and seek opportunities for students to learn through experiences in the longitudinal care of patients. A number of innovative programs have made longitudinal care the central experiential component of clinical education, including Harvard Medical School.  In this session, Dr. David Hirsh, the cofounder and Director of the Harvard Medical School –Cambridge Integrated Clerkship (CIC) will share his experience and present the data, literature, and global reach of this transformation. 

The CIC is a complete redesign of the principal clinical year to foster students’ learning from close and continuous contact with cohorts of patients in the core clinical disciplines.  With year-long mentoring by clinical faculty, students follow their patients through all major venues of care. Didactics are case-based tutorials about core topics, deliberately connecting to the students’ actual patients, and actively integrating basic, clinical, and social sciences. Longitudinal integrated medical education is designed to progress developmentally and to centralize building the professional role. In addition to strict attention to building clinical skills, the structure focuses on reflective practice, humanism, peer-peer and interprofessional learning and assessment, communication skills, ethics, uncertainty, population sciences, cultural competence, and leadership.

Objectives

Participants will be able to learn about Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships (LICs):

  1. Explain the goals, underlying principles, and the connection to the learning sciences
  2. Describe the structure and implementation steps
  3. Discuss evaluation methods and results
  4. Depict the national and international scope of LICs

Presenter

photo ot david hirsh

David Hirsh, M.D.
Co-founder and Director, Harvard Medical School–Cambridge Integrated Clerkship, Scholar of the Academy, and
Instructor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School


Are you using something other than PowerPoint in the classroom and want to get immediate feedback from your participants using clickers?

TurningPoint AnyWhere:  Extending Clicker Capabilities to Poll in ANY Application

Wednesday, May 11, 2011
12:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
Location
101 White Hall and 261 Computer Lab

Description

TurningPoint AnyWhere is an application that allows you to expand clicker interactive capabilities beyond PowerPoint to poll from content in whiteboard software, web browsers, PDFs, Word documents and more - you choose.  This two-part workshop will start with a luncheon demo for participants to learn about the dynamic capabilities of TurningPoint AnyWhere. The second part will be a hands-on session in the computer labs for you to learn how to poll in any application. Topics include: software setup; basic polling; dynamic polling; countdown timer; question list; participant list; response/non response grid and reports.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Create interactive TurningPoint AnyWhere presentations
  • Implement question and participant lists to receive student and audience feedback
  • Generate reports based on TurningPoint AnyWhere data

Presenters

photo of robert mcmillen

Robert McMillen
Higher Education Implementation Specialist, Turning Technologies

photo of melinda osman

Melinda Osman
Higher Education Account Executive, Turning Technologies


Would you like to write Multiple-Choice Questions that will reduce students’ grumbling about exams?

Multiple-Choice Exam: Transforming Questions into Clinical Vignettes that Effectively Test the Application of Knowledge

Thursday, August 11, 2011
12:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
08 Rathskeller, WSU Student Union

Description

This workshop will enable participants to transform the tedious chore of writing multiple-choice questions (MCQs) into an exercise that fosters critical thinking among learners, with a focus on developing questions with a clinical vignette focus that tests the application of knowledge.  Both qualitative and quantitative features that determine the quality of multiple-choice questions will be defined and used to analyze sample questions.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Apply criteria to identify flaws in MCQs, and practice transforming flawed MCQs into better questions
  • Discriminate among three levels of learning assessed by MCQs, and determine which level is addressed by a sample MCQ
  • Define difficulty index and discrimination factor, and apply these quantitative data to analyze MCQs
  • Apply a quantitative method for constructing an MCQ exam  to achieve a predictable mean score, based on historical data in an exam question bank
  • Practice transforming basic science knowledge questions into clinical vignette questions

Resources

Presenters

photo of paul koles

Paul Koles, M.D.
Associate Professor and Chair,
Pathology

photo of brenda roman

Brenda Roman, M.D.
Professor, Director of
Medical Student Education,
Psychiatry


Would you like to learn more about basic statistics?

Research in Medical Education: You Don’t Need to Know Greek to Understand Statistics

Wednesday, October 19, 2011
12:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.Location
101 White Hall

Description

This session will provide an overview of basic statistics which will include application of principles learned using medical education research examples.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Identify types of data
  • Choose appropriate statistics
  • Interpret the statistical results in a meaningful way

Presenters

photo of sabrina neeley

Sabrina M. Neeley, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Director, Physician Leadership Development Program, and Assistant Professor, Center for Global Health Systems and Policy

photo of adrienne stolfi

Adrienne Stolfi, M.S.P.H.
Assistant Professor, Biostatistics, Pediatrics

photo of nicole borges

Nicole J. Borges, Ph.D.

Professor, Community Health; Assistant Dean, Medical Education Research and Evaluation, Office of Academic Affairs


Questions and Suggestions

You can email your questions and suggestions to BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu or call (937) 775-2675.

For More Information

Please contact the Office of Academic Affairs

Faculty Development:

Patricia Hudes, MSIT
Director, Faculty Development
290 White Hall
(937) 775-2643

Medical Education Research:

Nicole, Borges, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean, Medical Education Research and Evaluation
290 White Hall
(937) 775-3196

2010

Would you like your students to view your presentations anytime, anywhere?

Your Voice and Slides, Online and on iPod: Recording Accessible Narrated Presentations the Easy Way

Thursday, April 15, 2010 (Limited Seating)
12:15-1:45 p.m.
White Hall

Description

Add your voice to PowerPoint presentations and put them online in formats that give students easy access, including students using video iPods. In this hands-on workshop, you will learn to narrate PowerPoint presentations and put them online with LecShare Pro, an easy-to-use application that is free for Wright State faculty, students, and staff.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Explain the challenges of creating narrated online presentations for education.
  • Prepare PowerPoint presentations for viewing online, on iPods and with adaptive technology.
  • Add narration and export captioned presentations in a variety of formats.

Presenter

photo of jeffrey hiles

Jeffrey Hiles
Instructional Designer
WSU Center for Teaching & Learning


Would you like to find peer-reviewed resources that you can use in your classes? Have your own teaching materials peer-reviewed and published?

Publishing Teaching Resources Online: The MedEdPORTAL Experience

Wednesday, June 16, 2010 (Limited Seating)
12:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
White Hall

Description

MedEdPORTAL is a free online peer-reviewed publication service provided by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in partnership with the American Dental Education Association. MedEdPORTAL was designed to promote educational collaboration by facilitating the open exchange of peer-reviewed teaching resources such as tutorials, virtual patients, simulation cases, lab guides, videos, podcasts, and assessment tools.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Learn all aspects of the MedEdPORTAL Web site and submission to publication process.
  • Acquire a working knowledge of how to develop and properly package the essential components of a complete MedEdPORTAL teaching module for publication through this unique open education resource.
  • Review the key elements of the commonly accepted principles of educational scholarship and identify how incorporating this criteria strengthens the scholarly value of a MedEdPORTAL submission.
  • Generate usage data as a means of demonstrating the scholarly impact of a MedEdPORTAL publication.

Presenter

photo of michael saleh

Michael Saleh
Sr. Project Manager, MedEdPORTAL, Academic Affairs, AAMC


Would you like to:
1. engage your students in a more effective learning format?
2. learn quick and effective teaching methods to use when time is limited?
3. integrate clinical teaching and patient care that are favorable to both patients and learners?

Clinical Teaching Panel: Strategies to Reenergize and Focus Your Clinical Teaching!

Thursday, August 19, 2010
12:15 p.m. - 2:15 p.m.
120 White Hall (McGee Auditorium)

Description

This Clinical Teaching panel will be moderated by Dean X. Parmelee, M.D., and will be divided into three 30-minute sessions as follows:

  1. Beyond PowerPoint: Formatting an Effective Adult Teaching Session, by Dr. Karen Kirkham
    A systematic approach to setting the right learning environment and choosing an effective teaching format.
  2. Teaching When Time Is Limited: High Yield Methods for Teaching on a Busy Service, by Dr. Corey Heitz
    Simple, effective teaching strategies for use during those busy days when there is not time for a traditional sit-down discussion.
  3. Patient Witnessed Precepting: How to Teach and Still Spend Time with Your Patients, by Dr. Anne Proulx
    Integrating clinical teaching and patient care using the One Minute Precepting Microskills set and the Patient Witnessed Precepting technique.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Format an effective adult clinical teaching session using a systematic approach.
  • Utilize several rapid teaching styles during their clinical experiences with students and residents.
  • Implement the One Minute Precepting Microskills set and the Patient Witnessed Precepting technique into their clinical office practice.

Presenters

photo of corey Heitz

Corey Heitz, M.D.
Assistant Professor
Clerkship Director
Emergency Medicine

photo of karen Kirkham

Karen Kirkham, M.D.
Assistant Professor
Clerkship Director
Internal Medicine

photo of anne Proulx

Anne Proulx, D.O., F.A.A.F.P.
Assistant Professor
Residency Program Director
Family Medicine


Would you like to learn effective methods to incorporate Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) into your teaching?

Evidence-Based Medicine: Current Trends and Effective Teaching Methods

Wednesday, October 6, 2010
12:15 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
White Hall

Description

Medical educators have increasingly embraced Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) since its introduction as a systematic approach to clinical decision making, medical practice and education in the early 1990s. Despite the availability of authoritative texts, teaching the basic EBM skills of formulating questions, finding the relevant literature efficiently, appraising that literature and applying it to patient care remains challenging. Teachers are regularly in a position to communicate the principles of these processes to learners in a variety of settings, including ward rounds, at the bedside, during journal club exercises, and in formal lectures and seminars. This session will offer some advice to help make the most of these teaching opportunities.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  1. Explain background EBM methodology particularly pertaining to student expectations in the clinical rotations, facilitating greater correlation and cooperation between biennium 1 and biennium 2 learning objectives and teaching processes.
  2. Share experiences and provide guidance on practical and effective methods to teach EBM.
  3. Analyze existing teaching activities and design an EBM teaching session.

Resources

Reference Articles

Workshop Presentation

Evidence-Based Medicine, by Marc Raslich, M.D. (PPTX)

Presenter

photo of marc Raslich

Marc Raslich, M.D.
Associate Professor
Program Director
Internal Medicine/
Pediatrics


Questions and Suggestions

You can email your questions and suggestions to BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu or call (937) 775-2675.

For More Information

Please contact the Office of Academic Affairs

Faculty Development:

Patricia Hudes, MSIT
Director, Faculty Development
290 White Hall
(937) 775-2643

Medical Education Research:

Nicole, Borges, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean, Medical Education Research and Evaluation
290 White Hall
(937) 775-3196

2009

Would you like to learn practical hints on how to structure and deliver effective feedback?

Effective Feedback: Doing Better Than What You Got

Wednesday, April 1, 2009
12:15-1:30 p.m.

Description

Effective feedback is crucial in medical education to sharpen learners' skills. This workshop will provide attendees simple, practical techniques in how to formulate feedback and effectively deliver your message to learners. During the workshop, participants will be able to practice giving feedback with these techniques using standardized learners.

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Explain the fundamentals of feedback for medical education.
  • State the six principles of effective feedback.
  • Describe the four-step approach to delivering effective feedback.

Resources

Presenters

photo of ann burke

Ann Burke, M.D.
Assistant Professor,
Pediatric Residency Program Director,
Pediatrics

photo of gregory toussaint

Gregory Toussaint, M.D.
Associate Professor,
Medical Student Education Director,
Pediatrics


Would you like to improve your PubMed searching skills?

Searching PubMed: Advanced Tips and More!

Wednesday, June 3, 2009
12:15-2:30 p.m.
Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall, and
281 White Hall, Computer Lab

Description

PubMed is a free database produced by the National Library of Medicine covering a variety of biomedical topics. This two-part workshop will start with a lunch and learn opportunity for participants to observe advanced search strategies and tips to make their PubMed searching more efficient and effective. A quick demo of other resources available through the Fordham Health Sciences website will also be included. The second session will be hands-on in the BSOM computer labs: participants will try their own PubMed searches or use the samples provided to test their newly acquired knowledge. The goal is for participants to experiment with at least one unfamiliar electronic resource!

Objectives

Demonstration Session: 12:15 - 1:15 p.m. (Luncheon)
Gandhi Auditorium, White Hall
Participants will be able to:

  • Observe advanced PubMed search strategies and tips to increase their searching proficiency.
  • Recognize and describe uses of library resources beyond PubMed.

Hands-On Session: 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.
281 White Hall, Computer Lab
Participants will be able to:

  • Use advanced features of PubMed to search effectively and efficiently.

Resources

Presenter

photo of bette sydelko

Bette Sydelko, M.S.L.S.
Head of Reference and Instruction,
Fordham Health Sciences Library


Would you like to make your teaching more interactive, engaging and fun?

Audience Response System: Making Your Teaching More Interactive

Wednesday, August 5, 2009
12:15-2:30 p.m.
260 White Hall, Academic Affairs Conference Rm., and
261 White Hall, Computer Lab

Description

The Audience Response System (ARS), also known as "clickers", is a wireless technology that allows students to anonymously respond to a question posed by the teacher during a learning session. A summary of the responses is immediately displayed, providing feedback to both the teacher and students on the level of understanding. The literature on ARS discusses its advantages, including active learning, feedback, increasing attention span and motivation. This workshop is divided into two sessions. The first session will present a variety of potential uses of ARS and explore its limitations and challenges. The second session will be hands-on, in which participants will learn that adding ARS questions to a PowerPoint is as easy as inserting a new slide!

Objectives

Demonstration Session: 12:15 - 1:15 p.m.
260 White Hall, Academic Affairs Conference Rm.
Participants will be able to:

  • Identify potential uses of ARS.
  • View medical education examples of ARS questions.
  • Recognize limitations and challenges of ARS.

Hands-On Session: 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.
261 White Hall, Computer Lab
Participants will be able to:

  • Create ARS questions in PowerPoint by using TurningPoint technology.

Presenter

photo of patricia hudes

Patricia Hudes, M.S.I.T.
Faculty Development Director,
Academic Affairs


Would you like to fully engage your students in learning your material?

Team-Based Learning™ in Medical Education: Transforming Small Groups into Productive Learning Teams

Wednesday, October 7, 2009
1:00-4:00 p.m.

Description

Medical Education is placing greater emphasis on active learning: learning that requires applying knowledge to authentic problems; and that teaches students to engage in the kind of collaboration that is expected in today's clinical practice. Team-Based Learning (TBL) is a strategy that accomplishes these goals. It transforms passive, lecture-based coursework into an environment that promotes more self-directed learning and teamwork, and makes the classroom come alive. This workshop will provide participants with a real TBL module especially designed for health professions educators who have little or no knowledge about it. There will be little sidebar commentary until the hands-on workshop is completed, thereby ensuring that participants understand the process from the learner's perspective. There will be no PowerPoints or introductory lecture!

Objectives

Participants will be able to:

  • Explain the key components of a successful TBL module.
  • Outline how they would construct a TBL module from a set of objectives.
  • Describe how they might convert a course/lecture they already teach into a TBL module.
  • Illustrate how to transform a small group into a productive learning team.

Presenters

photo of laurel elder

Laurel Elder, Ph.D.
Associate Professor,
Pathology

photo of paul koles

Paul Koles, M.D.
Assistant Professor,
Pathology Education Director,
Pathology

photo of dean parmelee

Dean Parmelee, M.D.
Associate Dean,
Academic Affairs


Questions and Suggestions

You can email your questions and suggestions to BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu or call (937) 775-2675.

For More Information

Please contact the Office of Academic Affairs

Faculty Development:

Patricia Hudes, MSIT
Director, Faculty Development
290 White Hall
(937) 775-2643

Medical Education Research:

Nicole, Borges, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean, Medical Education Research and Evaluation
290 White Hall
(937) 775-3196

2008

Would you like to deliver more effective lectures?

Large Group Presentations that Work

Wednesday, April 2, 2008

Presenter

photo of ronald markert

Ronald J. Markert, Ph.D.
Professor of Medicine and Orthopaedic Surgery; Associate Chair
Department of Medicine
WSU Boonshoft School of Medicine


Would you like to feel more invigorated to write more and better multiple-choice questions?

Multiple-Choice Exam Questions: Beyond Exasperation to Excellence

Wednesday, June 4, 2008

Read one of the shortest and best articles on writing meaningful objectives and effective questions for a unit of study: "Writing Multiple-Choice Questions for Continuing Medical Education Activities and Self-Assessment Modules."

Presenters

photo of paul koles

Paul Koles, M.D.
Assistant Professor, Pathology; Director of Pathology Education
WSU Boonshoft School of Medicine

photo of dean parmelee

Dean Parmelee, M.D.
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs
WSU Boonshoft School of Medicine


Would you like to present visual information like a pro?

Presenting Visual Data à la Edward Tufte

Wednesday, August 6, 2008

View the PowerPoint Presentation (PPTX)

Resources

Edward Tufte's website

Sparklines: There are two new add-ins for Microsoft® Office that create sparklines (mini-graphs) to visualize numerical data in dashboards, spreadsheets, reports and presentations created with Excel, Word and PowerPoint: Bissantz Sparkmaker and BonaVista MicroCharts. Product review article about these add-ins.

Presenter

photo of marvin miller

Marvin Miller, M.D.
Director, Department of Medical Genetics and Professor of Pediatrics and Obstetrics and Gynecology
WSU Boonshoft School of Medicine


Would you like to find peer-reviewed resources that you could use in your classes? Are you interested in having your own teaching materials peer-reviewed and published?

Educational Scholarship and MedEdPORTAL: Providing Online Resources to Advance Learning in Medical Education

Wednesday, October 1, 2008
8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (breakfast)

Sessions
WSU Boonshoft SOM • White Hall
8:00-9:00 a.m., Room 120, Alan W. McGee Auditorium
9:30-12:00 p.m., Room 281, Computer Lab

Visit the MedEdPORTAL website

Presenter

photo of michael saleh

Michael Saleh
Project Coordinator, MedEdPORTAL - Division of Medical Education
Association of American Medical College


Questions and Suggestions

You can email your questions and suggestions to BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu or call (937) 775-2675.

For More Information

Please contact the Office of Academic Affairs

Faculty Development:

Patricia Hudes, MSIT
Director, Faculty Development
290 White Hall
(937) 775-2643

Medical Education Research:

Nicole, Borges, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean, Medical Education Research and Evaluation
290 White Hall
(937) 775-3196

2007

All activities are claimable for Category II CME credits

2007 Calendar at a Glance (PDF)


Tuesday, April 3
12:00 - 4:30 p.m.
White Hall Gandhi Auditorium

Clinical Reasoning & Assessment in Medical Education

Presenter

Geoff Norman, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean, Program for Educational Research & Development Professor, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics; and
Associate Member, Department of Psychology
McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada

Resources


Thursday, June 14
8:00 - 1:30 p.m.
Kettering Center for Continuing Education

Educational Scholarship and MedEdPORTAL

Presenters

Robby Reynolds, M.P.A.
Director of Educational Resources
Co-Director, MedEdPORTAL
Division of Medical Education
Association of American Medical Colleges

Gary Onady, M.D.
Associate Professor
Department of Pediatrics


Thursday, August 9
8:00 - 9:00 a.m.
University Park Conference Room

Current Medical Education Research Projects in the Boonshoft School of Medicine

Can Faculty Development Enhance the Effectiveness of Individualized Learning Plans in Pediatric Residency Training?

Presenter

Ann Burke, M.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Pediatrics

Resources

Medical Student Perceptions of Boundaries with Patients

Presenter

Brenda Roman, M.D.
Director of Medical Student Education and Associate Professor
Department of Psychiatry
Boonshoft School of Medicine


Thursday, October 11
8:00 - 9:00 a.m.
University Park Conference Room

Millennial Students: Characteristics and Attitudes in a New Generation of Medical Students

Presenters

Carol Elam, Ed.D.
Associate Dean for Admissions and Instructional Advancement
Director of Medical Education Research
Professor, Dept. of Behavioral Science
University of Kentucky College of Medicine

Nicole Borges, Ph.D.
Director of Medical Education Research
Boonshoft School of Medicine

Resources

Articles


Questions and Suggestions

You can email your questions and suggestions to BSOM_FacDev@wright.edu or call (937) 775-2675.

 

Last edited on 08/11/2015.