Department of Emergency Medicine

Summary of Four-Week Clinical Block Rotations

R1 Year

Blocks

R2 Year

Blocks

R3 Year

Blocks

Orientation

1

Adult ED*

8

Adult ED*

8

Adult ED

5

Pediatric ICU

1

Trauma

1

Pediatric ED

2

Adult Medical ICU

2

Adult Medical ICU

1

Trauma

1

Hand Surgery/Orthopedics

1

Selective

1

Surgical ICU

1

Obstetrics

1

Teaching

1

Adult Pulmonary ICU

1

 

 

Anesthesia

0.5

Internal Medicine Inpatient

1

 

 

Toxicology

0.5

Anesthesia

0.5

 

 

 

 

Ultrasound

0.5

 

 

 

 

*Pediatric ED shifts equal to one block are completed during the 8 blocks of Adult ED.

R1 Year

The first year of training is designed to provide a broad base for residents to acquire the knowledge, skills and abilities requisite to emergency medicine throughout the remainder of their training and future careers. R1s are expected to see as wide a variety of patient ages, social situations, presenting complaints, management approaches and disposition decisions as possible. R1s must also acquire the technical skills in the handling of medical and surgical disorders in all age groups.

July of the R1 year begins with an intense month-long orientation including seminars, simulation, and procedural training to prepare the new resident with a foundation to approach some of the most common and potentially most serious undifferentiated patient complaints. A session on the rational use of ancillary studies is also presented. Managing personal & professional stress is another session targeted at resident wellness. Additionally, a series on workplace violence, physical safety in the ED, and personal defensive tactics is presented during the orientation month. This prepares R1s for three hands-on defensive-tactics classes that will follow. ED directors discuss documentation, risk management, cultural barriers to care, and patient satisfaction. Additionally, an introduction to disaster medicine is provided. R1s are fully introduced to their integral roles in disaster-response plans for the eight-county Ohio Emergency Management Agency Region II. R1s subsequently complete the short course in basic disaster life support (BDLS). This is complemented by a day of hands-on instruction in personal protective equipment (PPE) and decontamination techniques for healthcare providers managing patients exposed to chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) materials.

The R1 resident will work a reduced number of shifts in the emergency department during the orientation month.

R2 Year

The second year of training is designed for more in-depth exposure to emergency medicine. R2s are expected to focus on critical care, while refining their skills and efficiency managing less-emergent patients.

R3 Year

Senior residents are expected to apply and disseminate the knowledge they have gained from their previous training. As part of their graded responsibilities, R3s assume more supervisory and educational roles. During their teaching block, R3s also assist in the education of medical students in small-group discussions, high-fidelity simulations and clinical observation and feedback.

Last edited on 09/08/2016.