Curriculum

Staying Alive (SMD 580)

(Cardiovascular/Renal/Respiratory) Total Contact Hours: 10 credit hours

Course Directors: Timothy Janz, M.D., Professor, Emergency Medicine and Internal Medicine; and Irina Overman, M.D., Assistant Professor, Geriatrics & Internal Medicine

Course Description: This module is intended for second-year Boonshoft SOM medical students. The Staying Alive module will focus on the relationships between the cardiac, respiratory and renal systems under normal and abnormal conditions. Throughout the module, the learner will solve increasingly complex clinical case problems that exemplify core pathophysiologic concepts and make decisions about diagnosis and treatment that are evidence-based. Presentation and diagnosis of illness and disease across the life cycle are investigated within the principles of population medicine, molecular biology, pathophysiology and therapeutics.

Course Learning Goals, Assessment, Practice, Teaching and Learning Activities, and their Integration with the Institutional Educational Objectives:

Institutional Objectives

Learning Goals

Assessment Activities (graded)

Practice/Feedback Activities (non-graded)

Teaching and Learning Activities

K1

C3

P2

Describe the principles of cardiac, respiratory, and renal physiology and the mechanisms by which their function is maintained in health and in disease.

TBL RAT
Peer Instruction
Exams

TBL Application
WrightQ cases

Textbook Readings

Faculty Notes

K1

C3

P2

Explain interrelationships among all three of these organ systems under normal and abnormal conditions.

TBL RAT
Peer Instruction
Exams

TBL Application
WrightQ cases

Textbook Readings

Faculty Notes

K1

C3

P2

Describe the development of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems, and relate specific defects in developmental processes to congenital pathologies.

TBL RAT
Peer Instruction
Exams

TBL Application
WrightQ cases

Textbook Readings

Faculty Notes

K1

C3

P2

Correlate gross anatomy, histology, and pathology to explain the normal aging process and the clinical manifestations of diseases of the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems.

TBL RAT
Peer Instruction
Exams

TBL Application
WrightQ cases

Textbook Readings

Faculty Notes

K1

C2, C3

P2

Evaluate the role of diagnostic modalities in the evaluation of disease related to the cardiovascular, respiratory, and renal systems.

TBL RAT
Peer Instruction
Exams
OSCE
Simulation
Heart sounds
EKG Workshop

TBL Application
WrightQ cases

Textbook Readings

Faculty Notes

K1

C2, C3

P2

Describe therapeutic interventions to address the altered pathophysiology of these three organ systems.

TBL RAT
Peer Instruction
Exams
OSCE
Simulation

TBL Application
WrightQ cases

Textbook Readings

Faculty Notes

Institutional Educational Objectives

Category addressed Definition
1. Institutional Objectives What does our institution want our graduates to do?
2. Learning Goals If your students mastered the content of your course, what would they be able to do?
3. Assessment Activities (graded)
4. Practice/Feedback Activities (non-graded)
What will students need to do for them and others (peers, professors) to know whether they have achieved this specific learning goal?
5. Teaching and Learning Activities How will students get the information they need to learn?

Knowledge and Lifelong Learning

  • K1: The graduate will demonstrate knowledge of the basic medical sciences; clinical skills; and the ability to acquire, manage, and use current information for clinical decision-making and problem-solving in the care of individual patients, family members, populations, and systems of care delivery.
  • K2: The graduate will demonstrate knowledge of the ethical, social, economic, and cultural influences upon the health of and health care delivery to patients and patient populations, and will be able to propose realistic approaches to improving the health of an individual patient and for a patient population.
  • K3: The graduate will be able to identify the diverse factors that influence the health of the individual and the community; identify the socio-cultural, familial, psychological, economic, environmental, legal, political, and spiritual factors impacting health care and health care delivery; and be able to respond to these factors by planning and advocating the appropriate course of action at both the individual and the community level.

Interpersonal and Communication

  • C1: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to establish a professional relationship with a patient, build a comprehensive medical and social/personal history, conduct either a focused or comprehensive physical examination as indicated, construct a differential diagnosis, and recommend a course of treatment consistent with current standards of care.
  • C2: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to communicate (written and oral) clearly, professionally, and effectively with patients, their family members, health care team members, and peers.
  • C3: The graduate will demonstrate the capacity to listen to and respond appropriately to constructive feedback from peers and teachers, as well as give constructive feedback and evaluation to peers and faculty as requested.

Professionalism, Advocacy, and Personal Growth

  • P1: The graduate will be able to identify personal strengths and weaknesses in the care of patients and working with colleagues and allied health professionals, and, if indicated, demonstrate the ability to make changes in behavior that facilitate collaborative relationships.
  • P2: The graduate will demonstrate through the period of undergraduate medical education a pattern of responsible behaviors consistent with the highest ethical standards of the profession: honesty, confidentiality, reliability, dependability, civility, and punctuality.
  • P3: The graduate will demonstrate a commitment to leadership and the advancement of new knowledge.
Last edited on 07/22/2016.